Articulating Outcomes: Thinking Like an Assessor

As teachers, we need to not only unpack standards, set objectives and then make well thought out, fun lesson plans. We also need to ensure that students are gaining the knowledge we intend them to gain when we started planning. This should take place by high stakes (evaluation at the end) and low-stakes assessments (not graded). I will be using my Gr. 1-2 EFL cluster group objectives from activity 1 in this module for this assignment.

Standard:

English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary in the content area of Mathematics.

Formative assessment

So for this standard and grade level, I choose to focus on shapes first and then it builds up to shapes and colors, numbers, and then eventually shapes and numbers. There are a number of formative assessments I like to use depending on the unit content and progress. During the introduction phase of an objective, I like to use hand signals to teach shapes, since it is easy to from. I will teach each shape and then show students how to form the shape with their hands. Then ask them to show me the shape when I say the name and vice verse.

For the start of the next lesson before objective two, I selected the slap game (or swatting game) to assess my students’ progress of the first objective- Identifying four shapes and their written names.  It’s played in pairs with a set of cards and slightly competitive. Students are required to use listening, reading, and decoding skills as well as hand-eye coordination. They spread the cards on the table and listen to the teacher prompts and then slap the correct card. At the end, there is usually a clear visual for me to see if some students need extra help (losing 0-8) or if the game was evenly matched (4-4 /3-5).

For the start of the next lesson before objective two, I selected the slap game (or swatting game) to assess my students’ progress of the first objective- Identifying four shapes and their written names.  It’s played in pairs with a set of cards and slightly competitive. Students are required to use listening, reading, and decoding skills as well as hand-eye coordination. They spread the cards on the table and listen to the teacher prompts and then slap the correct card. At the end, there is usually a clear visual for me to see if some students need extra help (losing 0-8) or if the game was evenly matched (4-4 /3-5).

For the first, two assessments, my goal is to make sure students can identify shapes correctly using listening, reading and speaking skills. For the second objective, I would like to assess how well they form sentences and interchange the target vocabulary. Using a simple mingling or survey activity where students have cards with a shape and ask or answer questions before trading it. I can easily take part, listen, walk around and ensure I trade with every student at least once.

Summative assessment

At the end of the unit, I will give students a set amount of shapes that they can use to create any picture they like. At the bottom of the assessment sheet, there will be a table with all 4 shapes on the vertical axis and numbers along the horizontal axis. Students will have to tick a box to keep track of how many shapes they have been using and then finally write the number in the final box once they are done. They will then present their picture in a circle discussion pointing out the different shapes and using the target language they have learned. E.g. “This is a triangle. There are 5 triangles.”

My rubric would focus on:

  • Creativity
  • Pronunciation
  • Accuracy
  • Writing
  • Attitude towards work and friends (listening)

 

References:

Hilliard, PhD, P. (2015, December 7). Performance-Based Assessment: Reviewing the Basics. Retrieved April 12, 2017, from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/performance-based-assessment-reviewing-basics-patricia-hilliard

Lambert, K. (2012, April). 60 Formative Assessment Strategies. Retrieved April 12, 2017, from https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzYfzjQoASL_bXVxYUg4SE1lSk0/view

Stanford SRN. (2008). What is Performance-Based Assessment? Retrieved April 12, 2017, from https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzYfzjQoASL_dnhuemt5LThzcVE/view

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